History Blips

My followers on Twitter and Facebook are familiar with my meager contribution to the internet’s cacophonous fray of virtual communication. I commemorate “today’s date in history.” Some days it’s harder than others to find something blip-worthy.

I usually have to dig a little. There’s never a shortage of the bad or the sad: acts or declarations of war, bombs dropping, terrorist attacks, gruesome crimes, hideous massacres. Man’s gigantic history book would shrink to a pamphlet if negative events – just those of his own making! – were edited out. I love history now, but it’s taken me a half-century to learn how to love it.

In grade school, they called it social studies. I didn’t mind the geography segment: it was pretty fun playing around with all those maps and colored pencils. But history was just one big long bore. I remember struggling through each night’s reading assignment from a thick, new book whose glossy cover glorious adventures. Inside, I found mostly tales of death and destruction. Dates, dates, dates. Numbers. Tallies. The Battle of This. The Great Depressing That. I was terminally obsessed straight A student. I diligently forced myself to read *every* *single* *word*. To my shock and chagrin, I arrived in class the next day and discovered I couldn’t remember a single word.

So how did I become the History Blip Fairy? There’s more to history than wars and death and destruction. There’s culture. There’s art and literature and music. There are mysteries. There’s evidence of amazing and glorious creative imaginations. There are evolutions and explanations of why and how man has arrived at today that don’t need explosives to make them work. It all depends on the lens through which you study our past.

One definition of the word “blip” is a “bright spot of light” or a “brief upturn.” That’s my interpretation. Every day, I share a brief, bright spot in our history. A day when something good happened. Stop by and start your day with a smile.

Blip.